as if the laws were malleable

1999 – 2003

Mixed Media

As if the laws were malleable is a collection of over 100 book works each using the bible as the subject and location for investigations and interrogations relating to Judaism, the law, Jewish culture, politics and practices. Produced between 1992-2003, each piece was a bible that served both as the site and subject of a dialogue. Some addressed the law in relation to the body; others were made in response to current political events particularly within the Middle East.

Once described as “a feminist-dada-practice”, as if the laws were malleable are conversations, commentaries and dialogues on matters of Judaism and everyday life.

While some of the works are in private collections, many no longer exist as the materials used were non-archival. However most of the works in the series are documented on the site, as if the laws were malleable.

Selected Exhibits
  • This is Not a Book, Institute of Contemporary Art, San Jose, CA (Curator: David Pace)
  • Women of the Book: Traveling exhibition of book works by 96 Jewish artist (Curator: Judith Hoffberg)
  • Access, Southern Exposure Gallery, SF CA
  • Articulated Silences, The Victoria Room, SF CA
  • Faculty Show, Art Department Fine Arts Gallery, San Francisco State University
  • Revolving Histories/Elusive Script, Camerawork Gallery, SF CA

The Bible Battery is included in CHEMISTRY AND ART, Aesthetics and Visualization in Chemistry , a net exhibition, CD-ROM and journal publication through HYLE- Internation Journal for Philosophy of Chemistry (Curators: Tami I. Spector and Joachim Schummer).

References
Branded, 2003 In response to growing conflicts and deaths taking place in Israel/Palestine, the Hebrew word for life, ''chaim,'' is seared into a Koran with a branding iron, and its corresponding Arabic word, ''hayat,''seared into the Torah.

Branded, 2003
In response to growing conflicts and deaths taking place in Israel/Palestine, the Hebrew word for life, ”chaim,” is seared into a Koran with a branding iron, and its corresponding Arabic word, ”hayat,”seared into the Torah.